Style Guide

selected shoe styles and types of sole stitches

STYLES

Oxford

The quintessence of men’s elegance. Oxford shoes come in many varieties, they may be adorned or plain. The models made of black leather are the most formal version, to be worn with an evening suit. The patent leather model is only suitable with a tuxedo or a tailcoat. Closed lacing does not allow adjustment; therefore, the shoes have to fit the foot perfectly to be comfortable.

plain oxford

cap-toe oxford

adelaide

balmoral/galosh

whole-cut oxford

Derby

A less formal shoe. Comes in many varieties with different numbers of eyelets in the quarter, quarter shapes, and adornments. The more formal versions have five eyelets and cover the instep entirely. The two-eyelet versions are informal and go well with jeans. Comfortable open lacing allows easy adjustment.

five-eyelet derby

three-eyelet derby

blucher

two-eyelet derby

norwegian

Brogue

Distinctive low shoes adorned with pinking and perforations. They come with closed or open lacing. Also, they differ in the shape of seams on the sides and toes. The fewer adornments, the more formal the shoe. Although intended for less formal occasions, nowadays they are acceptable with a daytime suit. They look stunning in colours other than black, as well as in nubuck and suede.

austernity

full-brogue

semi-brogue

quarter-brogue

longwing

spectator

saddle shoe

Monk-strap

Shoes with buckle straps. This style is becoming popular. A stylish alternative to laced Derby and Brogues. The version with a single buckle and a closed throat (Oxford style) is considered more formal. Monks look excellent in colours other than black, as well as in nubuck and suede. They are also available in brogued versions.

double monk-strap

single monk-strap (derby)

single monk-strap (oxford)

strap-less monk abbey

Moccasins and Loafers

An informal slip-on. Loafers with tassels are acceptable with a summer suit. Penny loafers go well with a less formal set. Moccasins are made in a different way from loafers and other men’s shoes. The sole and the sides of the upper are made of one piece of leather. A horseshoe-shaped piece is then attached to it with a distinctive U-shaped pleated stitch. Moccasins are informal and comfortably soft.

moccassin

penny loafers

venetian loafers

tassel loafers

snaffle loafers

evening slipper

Boots

Laced shoes with an ankle-high upper. In the autumn or winter, closed-laced boots, hidden under a leg of suit trousers, may be worn instead of formal shoes. The open-laced model with broguing is informal; it looks stunning when made of highly durable horse cordovan.

derby boots

oxford boots

balmoral/galosh boots

brogue boots (derby)

chukka boots aka desert boots

Chelsea Boots

Slip-on boots with an ankle-high upper, perfect for the colder seasons of the year. Lacing is replaced with elastic gore on both sides. Originally used in Australia as riding boots, in Europe they are often associated with the Beatles. The versions with a medallion or broguing are informal.

chelsea boots

jodhpur boots

Knee-high Boots

Classic slip-on boots with a high shaft, modelled on military boots. They can be made to serve as riding boots or as urban winter boots for everyday use.

riding boot

TOE STYLES

Plain Toe

Cap Toe

Cap Toe with broguing Perf

Wing Tie

Medallion Tip

Moccassin Toe

THE MOST COMMONLY USED TYPES OF SOLE ATTACHMENT

HAND WELT STITCHING

Most techniques of attaching the sole used in our workshop are based on the hand-welted construction. The bottom of the shoe consists of three leather elements: insole, welt and outer sole. Layers of leather are fastened with two stitches. The first stitch joins the upper and insole with the welt (see photo) and is not visible in a finished shoe. The second stitch fixes the welt to the sole and, depending on the technique, may or may not be visible at the feather, i.e. where the sole meets the upper. Underneath the sole, the thread is hidden in a closed channel. Hand welt stitching allows for resoling, as the welt holds the upper and insole together, which makes it possible to remove a damaged sole.

Hidden (blind) welt

A welt construction, with both stitches invisible. The second stitch is hidden deep under the feather.

SOLE THICKNESS MIN. 5 MM

Plain welt

A welt construction, with both stitches invisible. The second stitch is hidden in a groove cut in the welt.

SOLE THICKNESS MIN. 6 MM

Embossed welt

A welt construction, with the second stitch visible on the sole edge. The pattern embossed on the welt traces the thread.

SOLE THICKNESS MIN. 6 MM

Pearl stitch

A welt construction, with the second stitch done with decorative thick thread. The wide, conspicuous stitch resembles pearls.

SOLE THICKNESS MIN. 6 MM

Half-cemented welt

A light welt construction. The second stitch is replaced with cementing, which allows a thinner sole.

SOLE THICKNESS MIN. 4 MM

OTHER TECHNIQUES

Blake stitch

A welt-less construction that produces a light and soft shoe, like with the cemented construction. The upper is stitched to the leather insole and outsole with a single stitch, which is visible inside the shoe.

SOLE THICKNESS MIN. 3 MM

Cemented

A welt-less construction. The upper is glued to the leather insole and outer sole. This technique provides a soft and thin sole.

SOLE THICKNESS MIN. 3 MM